Modernizm is my own personal zine dedicated to art. On this blog you will also find posts about other zines, zine related articles, reviews and Zine Fest Houston. Please enjoy. If you have comments or questions, email me (Stacy) at modernizmzine@yahoo.com.
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This zine was a gift from Jason on a recent trip to New York from Booklyn, a space I interned at during the summer of 2012.  It is by Erick Lyle and Caroline Paquita of Pegacorn Press.  Booklyn had a show of hers called Garden of the Womanimal, which sadly I did not get to see before it closed in June. 
I love Caroline Paquita’s work!  She does a lot of risograph publications and prints, which are so lovely.  Check out her Etsy store for more information on zines and things.

This zine was a gift from Jason on a recent trip to New York from Booklyn, a space I interned at during the summer of 2012.  It is by Erick Lyle and Caroline Paquita of Pegacorn Press.  Booklyn had a show of hers called Garden of the Womanimal, which sadly I did not get to see before it closed in June. 

I love Caroline Paquita’s work!  She does a lot of risograph publications and prints, which are so lovely.  Check out her Etsy store for more information on zines and things.

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ZFH 2014 Interview #10: Rough House Comics
Today we interview Rough House Comics, an Austin-based comics collective specializing in riso prints of their work! It is at turns surreal, obscene, hilarious, and thought-provoking stuff. Read more below!

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ZFH: How did Rough House come together? What would you say is the glue that holds the collective together in terms of style/content, if any?

RH: Rough House came together as a group of Austin cartoonists who wanted to leave their studios once in a while and engage with other artists with similar interests. Soon after, we purchased a Risograph and quickly started working on an anthology to showcase the best cartoonists we could find in town. We then starting looking beyond Austin to include quality work from both established and unknown comics artists from around the world.

ZFH: Why do you create zines?

RH: Books are a format that humanity has been experimenting with longer than most of the media we encounter on a daily basis. In this digital age it’s nice to experience a work of art that takes up space in the physical world. The sense of touch is more important than we give it credit for.

ZFH: Why do you like zines?

RH: There are no rules and they are relatively inexpensive to produce.

ZFH: How did you become interested in zines?

RH: 
When people think of zines they often think of black and white photocopied punk zines. While this tradition is certainly a contingent in the zine community, we came to zines from the tradition of artist books and mini-comics and that’s where our focus lies.

ZFH: What is your favorite part of zine fest?

RH: I attended Zine Fest in 2012 and had a great time meeting other artists and zine enthusiasts. There’s such a great sense of encouragement and community at events like this.

ZFH: What is something that you’re looking forward to about the 2014 Zine Fest Houston?

RH: I heard the venue is great and I can’t wait to check it out.
ZFH: What are your favorite zines/mini-comics etc.?
RH: The last few years have seen a small explosion of micro-publishers of comics. There are now dozens of comics subscription services that are usually printed, stapled, and distributed by one or two people on a very small budget. It’s great to see that the internet has only strengthened the print community. I like the work that’s being put out by Space Face, Retrofit, Oily, and Sparkplugamong several others.
ZFH: What made you decide to participate in the 2014 Zine Fest Houston?
RH: We attended the MenilFest and had a great time. Everyone told us to go to Zine Fest. Houston always treats us well.
Gillian Rhodes

Gillian Rhodes

ZFH: What new projects are you working on this year?

RH: We’ll be publishing various mini-comics in the comingmonths including a Summer Zine, some collaborative comics, and a comic by Austin artist James Roo. And we’ll hopefully have the next Rough House anthology out in the spring.

ZFH: What is something you think people should know about DIY in Houston?

RH: It exists!

ZFH: Haha! Short and sweet. Love it.What will be on your table at this year’s Zine Fest?

RH: 
We will have copies of our latest anthology, Rough House 2. It contains comics from over a dozen artists. We’ll also have various mini-comics available.
ZFH: What other creative ventures do you have besides making zines?

RH: The members of our collective are individually involved in creative endeavors that range from music and painting to figure skating. Our love of comics brings us together.

ZFH: Why does self-publishing appeal to you?

RH: It allows you to work with minimal financial risk, which in turn allows for greater artistic freedom.

ZFH: What is the concept behind your zine/zines?

RH: We just aim to publish interesting comics. The avant-garde and slapstick comedy are equally at home on our pages.

ZFH: How long have you been creating zines?

RH: Our collective formed in 2012 but our members have been producing mini-comics for some time before that.

ZFH: What is/are your favorite place(s) in Houston?

RH: 
The Orange Show

ZFH: What do you think the zine/self publishing scene in Houston will be like in 20 years?

RH: 
Hopefully it will just continue to grow stronger and gain more visibility.
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Space City Nerd Podcast

Zine Fest Houston was featured on this week’s Space City Nerd podcast!  You can listen to the podcast here.  

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ZFH 2014 Interview #9: Snapshot Magazine

We are excited to catch up with Snapshot Magazine, an Austin-based publication featuring contemporary art and writing. Both Armando Garcia and Danea Johnson, creators of Snapshot, are sharing the interview space (they have put the name of the respondent after their respective answers!)

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ZFH: Why do you create zines?

SM: Zines are a generous form of expression. They can be personal or include global or social issues. The versatility of such a platform and ease of publishing zines is what makes it worth it.

ZFH: How did you become interested in zines?

SM: I first became introduced to zines when I started attending local music shows in South Texas. I was in my teens then, but I didn’t really become interested in zines until college. That’s when I met and made friends who actually took some part in zine culture, even if it was just reading or collecting them. They talked to me about them and I fell in love with the idea. — Armando

I also became interested in zines during undergraduate in San Marcos, Texas. My sister and a good friend would spend our free time cutting, pasting and writing things for our zines. They were never published or formalized in any fashion and ended up in the trash. We were young and experiencing life outside of our privileged, formative years, so I’m sure the issues we talked about were personal, about girlhood and growing up. Every once in awhile we would go to Austin and visit Tower Records on Guadalupe (closed 10 years now!) to check out their selection. — Danea

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ZFH: What are your favorite zines/mini-comics etc.?

SM: Our friend Sarah Frey —a major contributor to our magazine and a fave artistpublishes Lessons in # Reality from time to time. It’s hardly available, but I’m pretty grateful that I have the past two issues that she’s made. I was able to get my hands on a reissue of Guide to Dating Gangsters Volume 1. I love stuff that takes a good look at ridiculous stereotypes and how f’ed up views on sexuality have become between cultures and within subcultures. It’s really harsh and hysterical, but only because it’s true. It’s handmade by Vice Versa Press and I think they were at your zine fest last year. — Armando

Right now I’m really into Vagina: The Zine based out of Austin, Texas and published by Hillary-Anne Crosby. Crosby exclusively provides a platform for women to express their creative sides, whether it’s drawings, poetry or short stories. It’s a role model of a zine. — Danea

ZFH: Why does self-publishing appeal to you?

SM: Besides abiding by your printer’s standards, there are no rules in self-publishing. I have found it to be a culmination of the many aspects of design: creative writing, technical writing, layout, graphics, printing, crafting, and conceptualizing.

On the other hand, I can’t hide behind the fact that I was pretty privileged to have a job when we made the first issue. I was able to spend a good chunk of money on design software, a printer and a binder to compile and saddle stitch the magazine for us. Now I don’t really have a paying job, but we still plan on using the money we made on the sales of the first issue to put towards printing the second issue. It’s a vicious and beautiful, art cycle. It’s also the beauty of self-publishing. You have full control over all the aspects that are involved in making a book, magazine, or zine. The point being that I am focused on publishing forms of self-expression.

We are both vested in the DIY mentality and we love that Snapshot Magazine can be whatever the reader wants it to be. To some it’s a pretty-looking zine, some consider it a new magazine format and there are even some who look at it as a coffee table piece. That’s what I aim for — bend/break the rules of traditional publishing. If you will, we shouldn’t be concerned with separating the cultures. Publishing should be fun and free. It should be a platform for art. — Armando

Self-publishing allows for different voices to be heard and legitimized through the power of readership. There’s freedom in not having an editorial board backed by advertising interests. You can do whatever it is you want to do and freely admit your biases. This freedom also comes with a responsibility to the work that you produce.

And yeah, it’s fun. The best part is getting to know our contributors and hearing their stories. — Danea

ZFH: What is the concept behind your zine/zines?

SM: Our focus is artists, designers, musicians and creative forces. We feature interviews, writing and photography. It’s our take on arts and culture in Texas. We may branch out of Texas, but so far we have focused on our home state.

ZFH: What is your creation process like when starting a new issue of Snapshot Magazine?

SM: Concepts usually brew in our minds for what seems a lifetime. We light a candle and make a wish and say a prayer. Then, the universe kicks our asses into high gear and we gather content and design for an issue in less than two months. At least, that’s the approach that we have taken for the past two issues.

In those two months, we may interview almost a dozen artists through emails and at meetings or events. Sometimes people contribute their photography, but for the most part Danea shoots all the photos. Meanwhile all the concepts come to fruition in the layouts, design quirks and typesetting. I tend to lose track of the number of test prints that we go through and then VOILA!

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On a personal note, reading about the creative process has made me feel MUCH better as I scramble to get my own zine together in these last few weeks!! Thanks guys, can’t wait to see Snapshot at fest!